HVDC Connection

The wind farm will be connected to the Adelaide power grid via two 300 MW High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) submarine cables across Gulf St Vincent.

HVDC is a state-of-the-art power system designed to transmit power underground, underwater and over long distances. Buried beneath the sea floor, HVDC offers a number of environmental benefits, including ‘invisible’ power lines, neutral electromagnetic fields, oil-free cables and compact converter stations.

In its simplest form, HVDC technology works by converting traditional AC power to DC form, transporting it via special cable and re-converting back into AC form.

The HVDC system for the Ceres Project eliminates the current transmission constraints on the Yorke Peninsula, enabling a broader array of renewable energy solutions to be developed. Power losses will also be reduced and power security for Adelaide and the Yorke Peninsula could be improved.

The connection system will comprise approximately 60 kilometres of marine cable and 14 kilometres of terrestrial cable. Two HVDC cables of 300 MW capacity each, will be laid next to each other on the seabed between Port Julia and St Kilda and trenched to a suitable depth. It will be possible to transmit power in both directions however the main power flow will be from the wind farm on Yorke Peninsula to the power grid system in metropolitan Adelaide.

 

HVDC is a state-of-the-art power system designed to transmit power underground, underwater and over long distances. Buried beneath the sea floor, HVDC offers a number of environmental benefits, including ‘invisible’ power lines, neutral electromagnetic fields, oil-free cables and compact converter stations.

In its simplest form, HVDC technology works by converting traditional AC power to DC form, transporting it via special cable and re-converting back into AC form.

The HVDC system for the Ceres Project eliminates the current transmission constraints on the Yorke Peninsula, enabling a broader array of renewable energy solutions to be developed. Power losses will also be reduced and power security for Adelaide and the Yorke Peninsula could be improved.

The connection system will comprise approximately 60 kilometres of marine cable and 14 kilometres of terrestrial cable. Two HVDC cables of 300 MW capacity each, will be laid next to each other on the seabed between Port Julia and St Kilda and trenched to a suitable depth. It will be possible to transmit power in both directions however the main power flow will be from the wind farm on Yorke Peninsula to the power grid system in metropolitan Adelaide.

Website design by ChinaShop © 2011